We work, shark dive, and live here in Jupiter, but I have been a loyal local for 35 years of my 36 years of life.

The Jupiter we know and love today is the best-kept secret in Florida, and maybe in the nation. We have some of the highest-rated beaches and beachfront dining among many respected travel aficionados, like the Travel Channel. In 2012, Coastal Living rated Jupiter the 9th happiest seaside town in America. I know this to be true; we are a happy, cheery town!

Jupiter is the inspiration for many Hollywood productions. One of the latest, American Horror Story, set the scene in Jupiter (yet required to film in LA per the Town of Jupiter). Award winning screenplay writer, Ryan Murphy loved our little town so much he had to incorporate it into AHS, but not without locally-stirred up controversy and a fight. Jupiter locals like to keep our little town sleepy, quiet, and just that: little. Residents refused to allow Murphy to film here, so he was forced to film in New Orleans, Louisiana, yet still kept the setting of the screenplay in Jupiter.

Stars and celebrities, young and old, flock here to reside discreetly and count among their number Celine Dion, Tiger Woods, Greg Norman, Burt Reynolds, Alan Jackson, family fried Shelby Chesnes, Michael Jordan, Jack Hanna, Tori Amos, and the Bush family, just to namedrop a few.

The town of Jupiter, Florida, was founded February 9, 1925, and is blessed with a rich history.

I am a member of the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Museum, and have been coming here since I was a young girl. Everything I know and love about this town came from the guides over the years. Between the lighthouse, and Jonathan Dickenson State Park, I learned more about my hometown than most people could ever imagine. I definitely recommend a visit to both.

Jupiter as you know it today was actually originally named after the Hobe Indian tribe, which lived and called home the mouth of the Loxahatchee River. It is said that a mapmaker misunderstood the Spanish spelling to be ‘Jobe’, coming from the Indian name ‘Hobe’, and recorded it as ‘Jove’. Jove in Latin translates to ‘god of Jupiter’. Jupiter is a Roman god; with Zeus the equivalent god in Greek mythology. Jupiter is the god of all of the sky and light, and the state, including its laws and welfare. And hence Jupiter was born. Juno was Jupiter’s companion, and soon our neighboring town Juno Beach was born. Juno Beach is home to the Loggerhead Marinelife Center, a sea turtle rehabilitation and rescue center. I urge you to visit and donate to their cause. Our sea turtles are extremely important to our local marine environment, including our sharks.

Through Jupiter and to the north, the Loxahatchee River flows. What we now know as Hobe Sound is home to Jonathan Dickenson State Park, which harbored Trapper Nelson, the “Wildman of the Loxahatchee”.  Trapper Nelson settled the area in the 1930’s and lived off the land and made a living off of his wildlife zoo. You can tour this site at the park.

Hobe Sound is also home of Jupiter Island, one of the wealthiest zip codes in the world (33455).

Sandwiched between Jupiter and Hobe Sound, just before the county line, is the village of Tequesta. Tequesta was founded in the 1950’s and named after the Tequesta Indians.

As you may have guessed, much of our history can be contributed to our Native Florida, Native American tribes. And the lighthouse can claim the same.

The Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse site was originally chosen in 1853, and the lighthouse was originally designed by engineer Major General Gorge G. Meade (modified later).

Supplies were forced down the Indian River (Seminole territory) to get to the building site, and subsequently caused the Third Seminole War. This halted construction from 1856-1858, and it was finally completed in 1860.  Being close to a war zone and burials, naturally ghost stories and legends have surfaced over the years.

We look forward to hosting you soon, and I hope you love our little town as much as we do!